STUDENT LOAN BANKRUPTCY | How to Prove Undue Hardship

STUDENT LOAN BANKRUPTCY

HOW TO PROVE UNDUE HARDSHIP

STUDENT LOAN BANKRUPTCY

Have you heard your student loans will follow you to the grave and you can't even discharge them in bankruptcy?

Well, today we're gonna show you how to prove undue hardship and get your student loans forgiven in bankruptcy.

Proving undue hardship can be tricky, but we've done the research so you don't have to.

So what happens to student loans during bankruptcy?

It's general advice that the loans are not forgiven unless you show undue hardship through an adversary proceedings. Most courts use the Brunner test to determine hardship, so let’s see exactly how to prove undue hardship.

3 Requirements to Prove Undue Hardship

  1. You wouldn't be able to maintain a minimal standard of living if you have to pay back your federal student loans. You must have a bare-bones budget and have done everything in your power to increase your income with no success.
  2. Must be able to prove that the circumstances are going to be there for the majority of your repayment period. For instance, if you have a serious mental or physical disability, if you receive poor quality education, or if you’ve already maximized the income potential in your current field.
  3. You've made a good-faith attempt to repay your federal student loan before this point. This means that you've tried to make payments, you've negotiated with the lender and you've worked at slashing your expenses and increasing your income.

Let's say you go to bankruptcy court and you go through the adversary proceeding. If it’s successful your loans will either be partially discharged, fully discharged or they could also be restructured. When loans are restructured you'll receive new repayment terms, likely lower interest rate, a longer time-frame to pay them back which will result in lower payment.

If you went to a for-profit school

There is one caveat here to consider if you went to a for-profit school, make sure to raise a defense related to the school’s practices. If you can prove there was a breach of contract or deceptive practices, you can have a chance at convincing the judge to just charge your student loans.

We've read about some of these things happening with schools who promised certain career opportunities or certain wages after graduation as part of luring students into these for-profit schools. A lot of judges are ruling in favor of the students that they were duped or deceived into going to the school in the first place and acquiring all of that debt.

Negatives to Filing Bankruptcy

Obviously, there are some negatives to consider before going into bankruptcy.

  1. It definitely hurts your credit score. You won't be able to buy a house for 7 years.
  2. The legal fees cost money. If you can't find an attorney that will take you on pro bono, you would be out of pocket for those expenses.
  3. It's really exhausting and an extensive process that could take 6 months to a year to complete.

As we've talked about above, if you've done everything you can and you still can't pay back your loans, it might be the only option for you.

If that's the case, here are some things to consider before going into bankruptcy court.

Things to Consider Before Filing Bankruptcy

  1. Make sure you've exhausted all of your other options. We touched on that above, but it's gonna be really important to the court that you've done your best. Not only that, but also to confirm there is no way you can avoid going into bankruptcy. Some of these things could be looking at income driven repayment plan, pursuing forbearance or deferment, or if you're eligible definitely look into public service loan forgiveness.
  2. With private loans, make sure that you've already talked to your lender and you've tried to restructure or get reduced payment plan, reduce interest rate, or reduce payments. Definitely call your lender before pursuing bankruptcy.

After you've exhausted all those options, the next step would be to find a lawyer that has successfully discharged student loans. The lawyer would need to file an adversary proceeding, which we will talk about it in a bit, to get the student loans successfully discharged.

While an attorney isn't absolutely necessary, you'll want one to improve your odds of having the loans discharged as it is quite difficult to get them discharged.

You'll likely also need to find a pro-bono attorney who would take your case on free of charge. If you are in this situation where you can't pay your student loans, you'll likely be unable to afford the attorney fees otherwise.

Then, once you’ve found a lawyer who will take you on pro-bono, just do what the lawyer says. You may be able to file chapter 7 or you may be able to file chapter 13 depending on your personal situation.

With chapter 7 your loans could be discharged, but with chapter 13 your loans would be restructured and not discharged. So, with chapter 13 you will have to continue to pay those student loans, although they will be on more manageable terms.

Then, the lawyer will file the adversary proceedings, which is a lawsuit related to the bankruptcy and then the judge will determine whether not you will receive a full discharge, a partial discharge, no discharge or a restructure.

As always, talk to a legal professional before making any big decisions like this. You can find a list of reputable lawyers by searching the American Bar Association. Many of them will offer a free consultation to review your case and to access your personal situation.

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PAY OFF DEBT OR SAVE FOR RETIREMENT?

PAY OFF DEBT OR SAVE FOR RETIREMENT?

payoff debt or save

So, is it better to pay off your debt or save money?

By the end of this post, you’ll know exactly whether or not you should pay off debt or save for retirement.

Having the right strategy of paying off debt vs saving will put you in the best financial situation in the long run.

Carla* (name changed for privacy) wrote into us asking if she should pay off her debt or save for retirement.

Carla’s financial situation:

  • $3,000 at 20%, $4,000 at 16% on credit cards
  • $12,000 car loan at 2%
  • $30,000 student loan balance at 9% interest
  • $120,000 balance on mortgage at 3%
  • Take home pay- $4,000 per month
  • Currently has no emergency fund saved
  • 401k company matches dollar for dollar on first 2%
  • So far she hasn’t been contributing to her 401k

The questions she has are:

Should she be investing in her 401k?

Which debt should she pay off first?

When to save up an emergency fund?

Should she pay her home off early?

Should she pay her car off early?

There’s a lot of differing advice out there.

People say you should save $1000 in an emergency fund even before you start tackling your debt.

Some say to pay off the highest balance of your debt first. Other people say she should pay off her highest interest rate debt first. Should she be saving in her 401k or not?

Here’s our answers to her burning questions:

Should she be investing in her 401k?

Yes, up to the match her company offers...as long as she can make her minimum monthly payments on her debt.

By investing up to the match, she essentially gets a 100% return on her money, which is unseen anywhere. But we wouldn't recommend she put any more other than the amount required to meet the match.

I wouldn't recommend Carla to put money into her 401k at all though if it was going to cause her to have late payments on her credit cards. 

Having missed payments on credit cards comes with late fees. It also hurts your credit, which could hurt refinancing her student loans down the road.

We are definitely going to encourage her to reduce her expenses as much as possible and try to increase her income in any way she can. Whether that’s picking up big economy work or something on the side.

Just something that’ll help widen that gap between her expenses and her income. Once that gap has been widened, she’ll be able to make her minimum payments and contribute to the 401K simultaneously.

Which debt should she pay off first?

Our method is not the Snowball method, it’s not the Tsunami method, it’s the Tornado method which is the fastest way to pay off debt.

In our Tornado method we recommend paying off the highest interest rate debt first. For Carla, that would be her credit card with 20%, then she would go for her second credit card at 16%, and then she would go for those student loans.

Methods like the Snowball method work because it’s a psychological trick you play on your mind.  We try to address the psychology behind money first and then go into the most mathematically optimal way.

This is the way we recommend doing it in our Own Your Debt course. In the course, we have an entire module on mindset because getting your money mindset and understanding your past habits and patterns around money will enable you to be successful at the most mathematically optimal method.

Should she save up an emergency fund?

No, not until her credit card debt is paid off. We know this advice is kind of counter to a lot of advice out there and we’ll explain why, but first, we need to talk a little bit about types of credit, revolving versus installment.

Revolving credit is credit cards, personal loans, things that you pay on every month but can also take money back out every month.

Installment credit is more like your amortization on your house or your student loans. You have a payment every month that will pay this debt down in 30 years and once you make that payment, you can’t just be like hey mortgage company, can I have that 500 bucks back this month I need to pay for something.

The reason we make that distinction between revolving and installment debt is that revolving credit typically has the highest interest rate because it’s usually not secured against anything like your home.

When you have high-interest rate debt and are trying to save money in an emergency fund you’re basically charging yourself interest on that balance that’s on the credit card.

We recommend paying more on your credit cards with this money you have in your emergency fund, so you could save yourself that interest. When you have it in a bank account it’s sitting there earning hardly anything, maybe 1-2%.

We recommend if you have revolving credit, you should NOT save an emergency fund and that you should put that money towards your credit card and save yourself the interest.

If you have an emergency come up, an unexpected expense, you can always get some of that money back out by using that credit card as that emergency fund while you still have credit card debt.

Now, we make a very clear cut there because you don’t want to be taking money off the credit card to pay for unexpected expenses when you’re done with credit card debt and your currently working towards paying off installment debt or a lower interest rate debt.

So in Carla’s specific situation, I would say pay your 20% credit card, pay your 16% credit card without having an emergency fund. After that point establish an emergency fund and then start paying on your student loans, because at that point you don’t want to go into credit card debt because you’re putting money on your 9% student loans.

The way to think about it is you never want to loan money at a higher interest rate to pay money at a lower interest rate,

which is basically what you’re doing if you’re holding an emergency fund while you’re paying 20% interest on a credit card.

On that emergency fund, you're earning 1%, maybe, but you’re paying 20% over on the credit card, so you might as well take the emergency fund and use it to pay the credit card off. Then if you have an emergency come up you can borrow money from the credit card.

That way, you’ve got yourself into this break-even interest rate situation instead of this big discrepancy between bank account and credit card.

But once you've paid off all your credit cards (revolving debt) and are working on your installment debt, it makes sense to build an emergency fund.

Why? Because you can’t take money back off installment debt, so once I put money into the student loan at 9 %, I can’t borrow it back at 9%. After that I'd have to go to the 16% credit card and borrow it, so now you’re in a better situation to have this discrepancy between 9% and 1% of your emergency fund.

Your emergency fund is the buffer keeping you out of 16% credit card debt, so that’s the way I like to think about this interest rate arbitrage which is the way to pay off your debt the fastest and also save yourself the most interest payments along the way.

Should she pay her home off early?

Depends on her risk tolerance. If she doesn’t tolerate risk well, then yes. If she would rather invest in the stock market, that money historically returns 7%, so she would be making more money by investing but it won’t be a straight line like paying off her mortgage would.

Her mortgage was 3-3.5%,  which is pretty low and at that point you start asking the question of whether you should be investing in the stock market or something else instead of paying off your house.

We have the personal opinion that you should invest it at that point instead of paying off your house early just because you have really low interest rate. But this is definitely going to depend on it each individual because it comes down to your risk tolerance.

The stock markets returns 7%-ish historically over the long run. When you look back though, that’s not a straight line, it’s very up, very down.

Over a 30 year period you might earn 7% while investing, but your house is a guaranteed 4% return. Some people are more comfortable with taking that guaranteed return on their money by paying off the mortgage early.

It’s all personal. If seeing the ups and downs of the stock markets really stress you out and you don’t like that, yeah, go for it, pay off your mortgage early.

It can be a really good feeling to be debt-free and if you paid off your house, you don’t have that obligation anymore, you don’t have a mortgage payment, expenses are more manageable so that can have a really freeing effect on your mentality and just kind of your financial security, so definitely some benefits are there to consider.

Should she pay her car off early?

Similar to paying off a home, 2% is a really low return on your money. We'd recommend consider selling the car and buying a cheaper one so you could get cheaper insurance and maintenance costs. You'd also not have a car payment, which would loosen up her expenses. If nothing else, definitely keep this car after its paid off for as long as you can.

Leave us a comment about any advice you have for Carla’s situation

If you have a situation you need advice on, leave em in the comments or send us an email hello @ owenyourfuture.com 

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DENIED? Public Service Loan Forgiveness HORRORS

DENIED? Public Service Loan Forgiveness HORRORS

DENIED pslf horrors

You may have seen in the news that 99% of the applicants to the public service loan forgiveness program have been denied.

By the end of this post, you'll know exactly why people are being denied and how to not be one of them. Scroll to the bottom if you'd rather watch the video.

We did the heavy lifting to make sure you get your loans forgiven.

Why are people being denied for public service loan forgiveness?

The first reason is that they don't have the right loan. To be eligible for public service loan forgiveness, you have to be in a Direct Loan. If you have other loans they can be consolidated into Direct Loans to be eligible, but you have to do that first.

The second reason is they refinance their debt in the middle of making their qualifying payments. Whenever you refinance your debt, even if you refinance to a direct loan, the clock still starts over, unfortunately.

The third reason is they didn't make 120 qualifying payments. In order to be a qualifying payment it has to be for the full amount shown due, so you can't do any partial payments. It can't be any later than 15 days after due date, so a late payment does not count. You also have to be employed by a qualifying employer.

What is a qualifying employer?

These are 501C-3's or nonprofits, in the government at any level (federal, state, local or tribal). You can work in emergency management, military service, public safety and law enforcement, public interest, legal services, early child education, public service for individuals with disabilities, public service for the elderly, public health, public education and public library services. There's also a lot with schools, like school library services, other school-based services, the Peace Corps and AmeriCorps also count.

In order to also be counted as a qualifying employer, you must be employed full-time at at least 30 hours per week and you cannot have your loan in a grace period, deferment, or forbearance.

The fourth reason why people were denied for public service loan forgiveness is that they were not on an income driven repayment plan. You must be on the PAYE, REPAYE, IBR or ICR plans. One caveat is the standard ten year repayment plan, also counts. If you made a year of payments on that plan before switching to an income based repayment plan, you'd be able to count those qualifying payments. However, if you went to it any type of extended payment plan that is a payment period longer than 10 years, those do not count towards qualifying payments.

The fifth reason why these people are not being approved for the public service loan forgiveness program is that they did not submit the proper paperwork. You must submit two pieces of paperwork, one is the public service loan forgiveness employment verification once per year and the income-driven payment plan income verification  once per year.

Make sure download our starter kit which includes the student loan flow chart to help you to pay off your student loans the fastest.

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Public Service Loan Forgiveness

PUBLIC SERVICE LOAN FORGIVENESS

Get your student loans forgiven in 10 years?

public service loan forgiveness

What is Public Service Loan Forgiveness?

How to Forgive Student Loans in 10 Years

Did you know you can have your student loans forgiven in 10 years?

By the end of this post, you'll know exactly how to qualify for the public service loan forgiveness program. Scroll to the bottom if you'd rather watch the video.

We heavily researched the public service loan forgiveness program, so that you won't be one of the 99% of applicants who applied, but have not yet been approved.

What is the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program?

The public loan forgiveness program is for people who work in public service and they're able to have their student loans forgiven after 10 years as opposed to the regular 20 to 25 years for people in the private sector who are on an income-based repayment.

We personally worked in the private sector and couldn't take advantage of this program, but it's a great benefit for those who can.

The public service loan forgiveness program was opened in 2007, so the first group of people who are eligible to receive forgiveness just came through in October 2017.

Check out our starter kit which includes the student loan flowchart to help guide you through the process of figuring out if you're eligible.

There are some details that you have to be aware of if you want to take advantage of public service loan forgiveness.

Are your loans qualifying?

The first thing to do is to make sure your loans are qualifying. Qualifying loans are direct loans only. You can consolidate into a direct consolidation loan from other loans like FFEL, Stafford Perkins, but you need to remember that the clock restarts whenever you consolidate. Parent loans can only be forgiven if the parent works in the public service sector and consolidates into a direct consolidation loan.

The second thing to be aware of is qualifying payments. With the public service loan forgiveness program, you have to make 120 qualifying payments. It's not necessarily ten consecutive years, it's the amount of payments that you make.

For example, if you made five years of payments and then had some payments that don't qualify for some of these reasons we'll talk about, you can pick up where you left off. You don't have to start over with another ten year period if that makes sense.

The third thing to be qualifying payment is that it has to be under a qualifying repayment plan. The qualifying repayment plans are all income driven. The pay-as-you-earn plan, the revised pay as you earn plan, the income-based repayment plan or income contingent repayment plan. The standard ten year plan counts, but any other extended payment plans, like a 20 or 25 year standard plan, do not count, so that's something to aware of.

The income contingent repayment plan is the only payment plan that allows parent loans to be on an income-based repayment, so if you do have a parent plus loan, it has to be in that repayment plan.

The fourth thing is the payments must be for the full amount shown due, so you can't do any partial payments and can't be later than 15 days after the due date.

You also have to be employed by a qualifying employer in the public service sector and you cannot have your loan in a grace period (which is the period right after you graduate), you can’t be in deferment,  postponing payments or in forbearance.

What are qualifying employers?

  • Government organization at any level
  • Nonprofits 501-3C’s
  • Other nonprofits like:
    • Emergency management
    • Military service
    • Public safety
    • Law enforcement
    • Public health

But you have to make sure that you fill out the Employment Certification form at least every year but preferably every six months, just to make sure that your employer is qualifying and that you are on track to be approved for the public service loan forgiveness program.

You’ll also want to make sure you’re current on the Income Driven Repayment Plan Form, which is required to be submitted annually as well.

So, download our student loan flow chart within the starter kit now, it'll help you understand the best way to pay off your student loans the fastest.

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FASTEST WAY TO PAY OFF CREDIT CARDS

FASTEST WAY TO PAY OFF CREDIT CARDS

FASTEST WAY TO PAY OFF CREDIT CARDS

Written by Alli

This post is all about the fastest way to pay off your credit cards using our Debt Tornado strategy. If you are confused about what the different strategies are, click our post on the Snowball, the Avalanche, the Tsunami and be introduced to our Tornado.

Scroll to the bottom if you'd rather watch a video.

So now we’re diving deep and showing you exactly how the Tornado works and how it is the fastest way to pay off credit cards.

Guess how much faster you can pay off your debt using the Debt Tornado than using the Debt Snowball?

You can pay off your credit card debts up to 20% faster and up to one year faster with the Debt Tornado method!

So let’s meet Debbie, a fictional character we made up to help explain the concept. She recently joined our Own Your Debt program and has $40,000 dollars in credit card debt spread across 5 different cards all with different balances and different rates.

She’s just like your typical American.

Debbie's Credit Card Situation

She has 5 different credit cards and they all have different balances on them and they all have different interest rates and the total amount of debt she has is about $40,000 dollars. Her average interest rate is about 21% which is fairly typical, 27% is high for like your travel rewards credit cards, 12% is on the lower end like connected to your bank account normally or something like that. Her minimal payments all add up to be about $1,130 dollars per month, which is a lot, it’s like a mortgage payment.

Debbie’s Income

After she pays for all of her housing and food, all of her needs, she has an another $1200 dollars leftover that’s going to go towards this debt.

As you can see that’s not much more than her minimum payment, really.

Caveat: A lot of people are in this situation where they're really just pressed to the limit as far as what their creditors demand to them for payments and what they can make. Definitely the biggest thing to start with is to try to distance that gap between your income and your expenses so you have more and more money to put towards your debt, it’s going to help you eliminate a lot faster, but we really use Debbie as this example so you can see how the strategy plays out for her.

Debbie came to us not really knowing what to do, she had a lot of questions like: Should she focus on building an emergency fund? A lot of people recommend building $1,000 dollar emergency funds even before you start tackling your credit card debt. She wonders if she should follow the Snowball method and pay off the smallest balance first as that what's a lot of people recommend too, and a lot of people have had success doing that too. She also wonders what she should do if an unexpected expense comes up, if she doesn’t have an emergency fund.

Debbie feels overwhelmed and out of control when it comes to her credit card debt which is absolutely understandable. There are a lot of people in the same place especially if you have $40,000 dollars’ worth of credit card debt and you're paying almost $1200 dollars a month towards your payments. It can seem really overwhelming and really hard to know what to do, where to start, and how to tackle it most efficiently.

So thankfully, Debbie joined our program and she now has a step-by-step guide to tackle her debt. We’re going to show you our recommendations for her so you can get preview of how you can apply our strategies to your personal situation.

Debbie's Timeline to Debt Freedom

So here you can see Debbie’s timeline to debt freedom

She joined the course in November 2018 and that’s when we put this projection together. You can see if she used the Debt Snowball method with a $1,000 emergency fund, she would pay off her debt in November of 2023. If she used the Debt Avalanche method with a $1,000 dollar emergency fund, she would pay off her debt about 3 months earlier, in August of 2023.

Using the Debt Tornado strategy, she would be able to pay off her debt in March of 2023, which is almost 6 months earlier that the debt Avalanche method and 9 months earlier than the Snowball method.

So how much money does Debbie save doing the Debt Tornado method?

Debbie would save almost $8,450 dollars in interest payments by using the Tornado method.

Imagine what you would do with an extra $8,400 or $8,500 dollars sitting in your bank account. You could take a trip to Europe. You could invest it!

You could do a lot of cool stuff!

So, how does this Debt Tornado work? And why does it pay off your credit cards the fastest?

Using the Debt Tornado method, Debbie pays down her debt by highest interest rate first. The Debt Tornado is basically a little tweak on the Debt Avalanche strategy. The biggest tweak is that she does not keep an emergency fund. I know a lot of you are throwing some red flags as you’ve been taught that you need to have to have an emergency fund to keep you out of going back into credit card debt.

But here is the situation: you're already in credit card debt! So by keeping this money in a savings account, you're actually causing yourself to pay more in interest than you would if you put this towards your debt immediately and started tackling that top interest rate debt from day one.

Without an emergency fund, people will ask what happens when we have an unexpected expense. So in Debbie’s case we estimated that she would have $1,000 dollars unexpected expense every 6 months that would account for some of those random unexpected expenses.

What would Debbie do when an unexpected expense came up? Debbie would put that expense on her lowest interest rate credit card.

Why we think that emergency funds are pointless when you have credit card debt

With a $1,000 dollars sitting in a savings account, how much interest are you earning on that money, maybe 1%, 2%?

2% if you’re lucky and are in a high interest rate savings account.

So, you're not earning much money on that $1,000 dollars. But meanwhile, your credit card balance is racking up interest at over 20%.

If you put that $1,000 dollars to work on your credit card debt, you'll be making more money in the long run.

Think of it this way: by putting that money towards your credit cards, you're saving yourself that 20% interest that you're paying on that credit card balance.

So, why do so many people recommend the Snowball method of paying down debt when the Tornado is clearly more advantageous?

That’s because paying down debt is exhausting and you will have unexpected expenses come up that make you feel like you're derailed and off-track and make you want to give up on your debt pay down game.

So, psychologically, if you have that emergency fund it helps people to feel like “okay I'm not derailed, I have this, I've prepared for this, I've planned for this,” which makes sense.

Given that it’s obvious that so many people suffer from paydown fatigue while paying down debt and feel like they're overwhelmed and get off course, how do we at Owen Your Future prevent debt pay down fatigue while following the strategy that makes the most sense mathematically?

A few things: we really stress community, accountability and identifying unconscious money habits.

In the first part of our course or the first thing we do with any coaching clients is it really try to tackle how you relate to money, how you think about money and dig up any past traumas or any past money experiences that can impact you negatively. The community aspect is there to support you and keep you going, keep you motivated, inspired by people sharing their wins, encouraged by people sharing their failures and struggles. It really helps everyone understand that there are other people going through the same thing you are, we are in it together and by working together and supporting each other we can get to the other side.

 

So if you're ready to Own Your Debt and tackle the Tornado method strategically and with care and confidence, you can schedule a call, talk to us, we’ll see how we can help you best, whether that’s coaching or courses. But just so you know, our free material is always going to be available, so wherever you are at your journey we have something for you.

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DEBT SNOWBALL vs AVALANCHE vs TSUNAMI vs TORNADO CALCULATOR

DEBT SNOWBALL vs AVALANCHE vs TSUNAMI vs TORNADO CALCULATOR

DEBT SNOWBALL VS AVALANCHE CALCULATOR

Written by Alli

Did you know you can save months by paying off your credit card debt by using the right strategy?

By the end of this post, you'll know which strategy is right for you. We'll be covering debt snowball, debt avalanche, debt tsunami and our favorite, debt tornado. We’ll also include a calculator comparing debt snowball vs. avalanche vs. tsunami vs. tornado.

Scroll to the bottom if you'd rather watch the video.

We've crunched the numbers of all four, to give you the best one.

So, what are these three strategies to paying off your credit card debt?

1. DEBT SNOWBALL

The first one, made popular by Dave Ramsey, is the Debt Snowball. This is based on paying off your lowest balance first. So, whichever credit card has the least amount on it, that's the one you go for first, doesn't have anything to do with interest rate, it is purely a psychological method because it gives you a quick win from the beginning, so you can see that debt gone.

The debt snowball is where you actually pay the most interest in the long run and it's the slowest way of paying off your credit card debt.

2. DEBT AVALANCHE

The second method is the Debt Avalanche. The Debt Avalanche, I'm not sure who coined this strategy, but whoever it was, was good at math. This is a mathematically based principle, instead of an emotionally based principle, like the Debt Snowball. This looks at your highest interest rate credit card first and that's the one you're going to attack first.

This one definitely reduces the amount of interest you're going to pay and you can pay off your debts faster than using the Debt Snowball method.

3. DEBT TSUNAMI

The third one is Debt Tsunami and this one is based on paying your most emotional debt first. If you have a debt to a family member or a friend that is really weighing on you that makes you worried, it keeps you up at night, this is the one you pay off first. This method helps you to overcome that emotional barrier right away. After you pay off the most emotional debt first, you go to the Debt Avalanche where you pay off the highest interest rate.

Depending on the status of your most emotional debt, this one could be slower than the Debt Avalanche, but it is likely faster than the Debt Snowball.

4. DEBT TORNADO

The Debt Tornado is a term we coined- it’s like a Debt Avalanche but with a little bit of twist. With a lot of these strategies listed above, their very first step (like Dave Ramsey’s baby step number one) is to save up $1000  dollars in your bank account as an emergency fund. We don’t agree with saving up an emergency fund first, and we know that’s pretty controversial, but we’ll explain why.

Sweet life Starter pack image (3)

The ultimate Sweet

Life Starter Pack

Everything you need in one PDF. 14 pages of our biggest lessons, mistakes, and tips on helping you reach the sweet life sooner. It even includes action steps so when you're done with the document, you'll know exactly what you need to do next. Goodbye confusion, hello clarity.

Here’s an example:

If you have $1000 saved up in a savings account, earning you 1% interest, but then you have $10,000 dollars as a credit card balance that has an interest rate of 30%, we recommend taking that $1000 dollars and knocking out some of that debt. By doing this, you would stop paying 30% interest on that $1000 dollars. The alternative (that Dave Ramsey suggests) is you can keep it in your savings account and use that emergency fund to avoid putting more money onto that credit card.  But we recommend bringing that $10,000 balance down to $9,000 and should an emergency come up, put that $500 back on a credit card. Then just keep paying it down after all.

The Debt Tornado is the fastest way to pay off your credit cards.

ONE CAVEAT

The purpose of the Dave Ramsey Snowball method is to feel like you got a win and you’re making progress. But with our clients, we’ve been able to show them through visual methods, using spreadsheets and graphs, that they are making progress even when they have unexpected expenses and hiccups come along.

So it’s really all about tracking, and if you want to download our starter kit, which have everything you need to get started.

Mindset is super important.

When you’re tackling one of your debts by one of these mathematical principles like the avalanche or the tornado, it is really important to make sure you have your mindset right from the beginning.

Our course really helps with that. With our clients and coaching students we go through a whole series of exercises to uproot limiting beliefs and make sure your money mindset is in the right place so you can really jump in and budget and pay down debt effectively and stay on track.

We’ll go over the details of the Tornado method in another post, but with the Debt Tornado method you can pay off your debt 10%  to 20% faster than the Debt Snowball or Debt Avalanche. So you can shave off months to even years depending on your personal situation.

To get the Debt Snowball vs. Avalanche vs. Tsunami vs. Tornado calculator join the family and download the starter kit!

The Snowball vs. Avalanche vs. Tornado Calculator

Snowball vs Tornado vs Avalanche Calculator

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